9-cis beta-carotene-enriched diet significantly improved cognition and decreased Alzheimer's disease neuropathology and neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease-like mouse models

Rachel Twitto-Greenberg, Sigal Liraz-Zaltsman, Daniel M. Michaelson, Ori Liraz, Irit Lubitz, Dana Atrakchi-Baranes, Chen Shemesh, Uri Ashery, Itzik Cooper, Ayelet Harari, Dror Harats, Michal Schnaider-Beeri, Aviv Shaish*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

A significant progressive decline in beta-carotene (βC) levels in the brain is associated with cognitive impairment and a higher prevalence of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this study, we investigated whether the administration of 9-cis beta-carotene (9CBC)-rich powder of the alga Dunaliella bardawil, the best-known source of βC in nature, inhibits the development of AD-like neuropathology and cognitive deficits. We demonstrated that in 3 AD mouse models, Tg2576, 5xFAD, and apoE4, 9CBC treatment improved long- and short-term memory, decreased neuroinflammation, and reduced the prevalence of β-amyloid plaques and tau hyperphosphorylation. These findings suggest that 9CBC has the potential to be an effective preventive and symptomatic AD therapy.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)16-27
Number of pages12
JournalNeurobiology of Aging
Volume133
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Elsevier Inc.

Keywords

  • 9-cis beta-carotene
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Beta-carotene
  • Cognition
  • Dunaliella
  • Inflammation

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