A cellulose-binding domain-fused recombinant human T cell connective tissue-activating peptide-III manifests heparanase activity

Meirav Rechter, Ofer Lider*, Liora Cahalon, Ehud Baharav, Mara Dekel, Daniel Seigel, Israel Vlodavsky, Helena Aingorn, Irun R. Cohen, Oded Shoseyov

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The chemokine connective tissue-activating peptide (CTAP)-III, which belongs to the leukocyte-derived growth factor family of mediators, was previously shown to be mitogenic for fibroblasts. However, it has recently been shown that CTAP-III, released from platelets, can act like a heparanase enzyme and degrade heparan sulfate. This suggests that CTAP-III may also function as a proinflammatory mediator. We have successfully cloned CTAP-III from a λgt11 cDNA library of PHA-activated human CD4+ T cells and produced recombinant CTAP-III as a fusion protein with a cellulose-binding domain moiety. This recombinant CTAP-III exhibited heparanase activity and released degradation products from metabolically labeled, naturally produced extracellular matrix. We have also developed polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and these antibodies against the recombinant CTAP-III detected the CTAP-III molecule in human T cells, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and placental extracts. Thus, our study provides tools to examine further immune cell behavior in inflamed sites rich with extracellular moieties and proinflammatory mediators.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)657-662
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume255
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 24 Feb 1999

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The authors wish to thank Dr. Orith Leitner for raising the anti-CBD-CTAP-III mAb and Mr. Raanan Margalit for his technical support. Ofer Lider is the incumbent of the Weizmann League Career Development Chair in Children’s Disease. This studies were supported by the Robert Koch-Minerva Center for research in Autoimmune Diseases.

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A cellulose-binding domain-fused recombinant human T cell connective tissue-activating peptide-III manifests heparanase activity'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this