A group that grieves together stays together: Examining the impact of Holocaust Memorial Day in Israel on affective polarization

Tamar Gur*, Shahar Ayal, Magnus Wagner, Eli Adler, Eran Halperin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Affective polarization is defined as the tendency to dislike, distrust, and maintain hostile attitudes towards supporters of other political parties or ideologies. In its extreme form, affective polarization may pose a severe threat to these groups' cohesion, functionality, and existence. The current study explored the role of sadness, elicited by memorial days, in temporarily reducing affective polarization and protecting societies from its destructive outcomes. In a longitudinal study (517 participants), participants were surveyed prior to Holocaust Memorial Day (HMD), during HMD, and after HMD. The findings suggest that affective polarization declined during HMD. This effect was partially mediated by an increase in sadness. It is argued that one main function of memorial days is to harness the power of sadness to maintain cohesion and integrity among national groups.

Original languageAmerican English
JournalPolitical Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 The Authors. Political Psychology published by Wiley Periodicals LLC on behalf of International Society of Political Psychology.

Keywords

  • Holocaust Memorial Day
  • affective polarization
  • emotion
  • memorial days
  • sadness

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A group that grieves together stays together: Examining the impact of Holocaust Memorial Day in Israel on affective polarization'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this