A multi-national, multi-institutional study of assessment of programming skills of first-year CS students

Michael McCracken, Vicki Almstrum, Danny Diaz, Mark Guzdial, Dianne Hagan, Yifat Ben David Kolikant, Cary Laxer, Lynda Thomas, Ian Utting, Tadeusz Wilusz

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

512 Scopus citations

Abstract

In computer science, an expected outcome of a student's education is programming skill. This working group investigated the programming competency students have as they complete their first one or two courses in computer science. In order to explore options for assessing students, the working group developed a trial assessment of whether students can program. The underlying goal of this work was to initiate dialog in the Computer Science community on how to develop these types of assessments. Several universities participated in our trial assessment and the disappointing results suggest that many students do not know how to program at the conclusion of their introductory courses. For a combined sample of 216 students from four universities, the average score was 22.89 out of 110 points on the general evaluation criteria developed for this study. From this trial assessment we developed a framework of expectations for first-year courses and suggestions for further work to develop more comprehensive assessments.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages125-140
Number of pages16
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2001
Externally publishedYes
EventWorking Group Reports from 6th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE-WGR 2001 - Canterbury, United Kingdom
Duration: 25 Jun 200127 Jun 2001

Conference

ConferenceWorking Group Reports from 6th Annual Conference on Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, ITiCSE-WGR 2001
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityCanterbury
Period25/06/0127/06/01

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