A Pirouette with the Twist of a Wheelchair: Embodied Translation and the Creation of Kinesthetic Commensurability

Gili Hammer*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

The field of integrated dance brings together dancers with and without disabilities to create a novel art form. In dancing together, participants engage in a process of “translation” to interpret and enact movement, a practice I term embodied translation. This practice involves distilling a movement to its kinesthetic and expressive core, then exploring potential manifestations of those elements through various uses of space, objects, and bodies. Performed among people whose means and range of movement vary widely, embodied translation necessitates the recognition of multiple pathways toward shared expression, engendering a collective of kinesthetic multiplicities. Based on fieldwork with projects of integrated dance in Israel and the United States, I examine participants’ verbal, embodied, kinesthetic, and material means of translation, questioning whether translation can in fact produce commensurability among diverse bodies. [translation, disability, dance, embodied knowledge, anthropology of movement, nonhuman].

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)292-304
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Anthropologist
Volume123
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 by the American Anthropological Association

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'A Pirouette with the Twist of a Wheelchair: Embodied Translation and the Creation of Kinesthetic Commensurability'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this