A retrospective study of 157 hospitalized cats with pancreatitis in a tertiary care center: Clinical, imaging and laboratory findings, potential prognostic markers and outcome

Ran Nivy*, Alina Kaplanov, Sharon Kuzi, Michal Mazaki-Tovi, Einat Yas, Gilad Segev, Jennifer Ben-Oz, Eran Lavy, Itamar Aroch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Pancreatitis in cats (FP) has been increasingly diagnosed in recent years, but clinical studies of large numbers of affected cats are scarce. Objectives: To describe a large cohort of cats with FP requiring hospitalization. Animals: One hundred and fifty-seven client-owned cats. Methods: Retrospective study, including cats diagnosed with pancreatitis based on sonographic evidence, positive SNAP feline pancreatic lipase immunoreactivity test results, increased 1,2-o-dilauryl-rac-glycerol-glutaric Acid-(6′-methylresorufin ester)-lipase activity, histopathology, or some combination of these. Results: One-hundred and twenty-two cats (77.7%) survived to discharge. Median time from onset of clinical signs to presentation was longer (P =.003) in nonsurvivors. Causes of FP included recent general anesthesia, trauma, hemodynamic compromise, and organophosphate intoxication, but most cases (86.6%) were idiopathic. Ultrasonographic findings consistent with pancreatitis were documented in 134 cats, including pancreatomegaly (81.3%), decreased (31.3%), or increased (14.9%) pancreatic echogenicity, extra-hepatic biliary tract dilatation (24%), and increased peri-pancreatic echogenicity (13%). Lethargy (P =.003), pleural effusion (P =.003), hypoglycemia (P =.007), ionized hypocalcemia (P =.016), azotemia (P =.014), parenteral nutrition administration (P =.013), and persistent anorexia during hospitalization (P =.001) were more frequent in nonsurvivors, whereas antibiotics were more frequently administered to survivors (P =.023). Nevertheless, when Bonferroni's correction for multiple comparisons was applied, none of the variables was statistically significant. Conclusions and Clinical Importance: Previously unreported, clinically relevant, potential prognostic factors, including hypoglycemia, azotemia, parenteral nutrition, and withholding antibacterial treatment were identified in this exploratory study. These preliminary results should be examined further in confirmatory studies.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1874-1885
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Nov 2018

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

Keywords

  • antibiotics
  • azotemia
  • feline
  • hypocalcemia
  • hypocarbemia
  • hypoglycemia

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