A retrospective study of serum β-hydroxybutyric acid in 215 ill cats: Clinical signs, laboratory findings and diagnoses

Itamar Aroch*, M. Shechter-Polak, Gilad Segev

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Serum concentrations of β-hydroxybutyric acid (sBHBA) are increased in cats with diabetes mellitus (DM), diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hepatic lipidosis (HL). This study assessed sBHBA as a diagnostic tool in 215 consecutively-enrolled ill cats in the general population in a veterinary hospital. At the time of presentation, sBHBA was within the reference range in 158/215 (73.5%) cats (median 0.27; range 0.00-0.49. mmol/L) and elevated in 57/215 (26.5%) cats (median 0.87; range 0.51-21.45. mmol/L).Compared to cats with normal sBHBA, those with increased sBHBA had higher frequencies of anorexia, weight loss, icterus, polyuria/polydipsia, hyperbilirubinaemia, hypertriglyceridaemia, pancreatitis, HL, DM and DKA. They had higher concentrations of bilirubin and triglycerides and lower concentrations of potassium, chloride and total protein. There were positive correlations (P< 0.01) between sBHBA and urinary glucose (r= 0.42) and ketones (r= 0.76), but there were no group differences in dipstick levels of urinary ketones. Cats with DM/DKA and with HL had significantly higher sBHBA compared to other cats. Receiver operator characteristics analysis of sBHBA as a predictor of HL showed that sBHBA was a good predictor of HL. Increased sBHBA occurs frequently in ill cats and provides useful diagnostic information, especially in DM/DKA and HL.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)240-245
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Journal
Volume191
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2012

Keywords

  • Diabetes mellitus
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Feline
  • Hepatic lipidosis
  • Hyperketonaemia
  • Ketones
  • β-hydroxybutyric acid

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