A unique PRDM13-associated variant in a Georgian Jewish family with probable North Carolina macular dystrophy and the possible contribution of a unique CFH variant

Prasanthi Namburi, Samer Khateb, Segev Meyer, Tom Bentovim, Rinki Ratnapriya, Alisa Khramushin, Anand Swaroop, Ora Schueler-Furman, Eyal Banin, Dror Sharon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: North Carolina macular dystrophy (NCMD) is an autosomal dominant maculopathy that is considered a non-progressive developmental disorder with variable expressivity. Our study aimed to clinically and genetically characterize macular dystrophy in a family (MOL1154) consisting of six affected subjects with a highly variable maculopathy phenotype in which no correlation between age and severity exists. Methods: Clinical characterization included visual acuity testing and electroretinography. Genetic analysis included Sanger sequencing and whole exome sequencing (WES). Results: WES analysis performed on DNA samples from two individuals revealed a heterozygous deletion of six nucleotidesc.2247_2252del; p.(Leu750_Lys751del)] in the CFH gene. Co-segregation analysis revealed that five of the six NCMD affected subjects carried this deletion, while one individual who had a relatively mild phenotype compatible with dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD) did not carry it. We subsequently analyzed the upstream region of PRDM13 that has previously been reported to be associated with NCMD and identified a unique heterozygous transversion (chr6:100040974A>C) located within the previously described suspected control region in all six affected individuals. This transversion is likely to cause NCMD. Conclusions: NCMD has a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes that can overlap with AMD, making it challenging to correctly diagnose affected individuals and family members. The DNA sequence variant we found in the CFH gene of some of the affected family members may suggest some role as a modifier gene. However, this variant still does not explain the huge phenotypic variability of NCMD and needs to be studied in other and larger populations.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)299-310
Number of pages12
JournalMolecular Vision
Volume26
StatePublished - 2020

Bibliographical note

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© 2020 Molecular Vision.

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