ABL and BCR Genes are not imprinted in androgenetic and gynogenetic human tissues

Haya Lorberboum-Galski, Shai Yarkoni, Amotz Nechushtan, Jacob Rachmilewitz, Nathan De Groot, Abraham Hochberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

In the translocation leading to the formation of the Philadelphia chromosome, the hallmark of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the translocated chromosome 9 (ABL), is of paternal descent whereas chromosome 22 (BCR) is of maternal origin (1). To study possible imprinting of the human ABL and BCR genes, we used human tissues exclusively endowed with their maternally (benign teratoma) or paternally (complete hydatidiform mole) inherited chromosomes. Using the sensitive PCR technique followed by northern blotting, we demonstrate here that ABL and BCR are expressed to a similar extent in androgenetic and gynogenetic human tissues, thus suggesting that ABL and BCR genes are not imprinted in these human tissues.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)621-627
Number of pages7
JournalBiochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Volume204
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 31 Oct 1994

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