Accounting for the Survival of Minority Governments: An Examination of the French Case, 1988–1991

Robert Elgie, Moshe Maor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines the post-electoral conditions under which minority governments operate. It is argued that a minority government will remain in office for so long as it enjoys the support of either a commitment to relations, to behaviour, or to outcomes. If no such commitments are forthcoming, then it will only continue to survive if there is a specific constitutional device upon which it can rely. This hypothesis is tested upon the situation in France during 1988–91. Here, Michel Rocard's minority government survived because it enjoyed a commitment to outcomes. On the occasions when this commitment was absent, the government resorted to the use of Article 49–3 of the Constitution in order to remain in office.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)57-74
Number of pages18
JournalWest European Politics
Volume15
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 1992

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