Adolescents in Divorced Families: The Interplay of Attachment Patterns, Family Environment, and Personal Characteristics

Idit Finkelstein*, Tsfira Grebelsky-Lichtman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The study examined adolescents (N = 230) in divorced families in relation to the adolescent’s attachment pattern, family environment, and personal characteristics. The findings revealed significant direct links of attachment patterns. Avoidant and anxious attachment patterns were found to influence adolescent loneliness, neuroticism, and well-being. Family environment factors of family cohesion, family flexibility, inter-parental conflict, and parent-child relationships significantly impacted adolescents’ social and emotional adjustment. Personal characteristics (child’s age at the time of divorce, length of time since divorce, and mother’s socioeconomic status) had significant effects on adolescents’ adjustment. Mother-child/ father-child relationships also had mediation effects on adolescents’ adjustment.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)120-149
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of Divorce and Remarriage
Volume63
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • adjustment
  • adolescence
  • attachment
  • divorce
  • family environment

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