Approaches toward the study of Halophilic microorganisms in their natural environments: Who are they and what are they doing?

Aharon Oren*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hypersaline lakes with salt concentrations exceeding 250 g/l are often characterized by very dense communities of halophilic Halophilic microorganisms imparting a red coloration to the brines. Such red waters can be found in the North Arm of Great Salt Lake Great Salt Lake, Utah, in crystallizer ponds of solar salterns Salterns for the production of salt from seawater, and in many extremely hypersaline alkaline lakes. At times even the magnesium chloride-rich waters of the Dead Sea Dead Sea have become red as a result of massive development of pigmented salt-loving microorganisms.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationAdvances in Understanding the Biology of Halophilic Microorganisms
PublisherSpringer Netherlands
Pages1-33
Number of pages33
ISBN (Electronic)9789400755390
ISBN (Print)9400755384, 9789400755383
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jul 2012

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2012 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht.

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