Association of the time that elapsed from last vaccination with protective effectiveness against foot-and-mouth disease in small ruminants

Ehud Elnekave*, Boris Even-Tov, Boris Gelman, Beni Sharir, Eyal Klement

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Routine and emergency vaccination of small ruminants against foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is mandatory in many endemic countries, yet data on the field effectiveness of the vaccines used is scarce. We conducted an investigation of a serotype O FMD outbreak that took place in a sheep and goat pen, and estimated the effectiveness of various routine vaccination statuses. We also evaluated the protection provided by colostrum administration and emergency vaccination. Animals which were routinely vaccinated twice were not clinically affected while disease incidence was observed among animals routinely vaccinated only once (p = 0.004 according to a two-sided Fisher's exact test). In groups vaccinated only once, there was a significant association between the average time that elapsed since last vaccination and the disease incidence (n = 5; Spearman correlation coefficient: rs = 1.0, p < 0.01). In addition, non-vaccinated lambs fed colostrum from dams vaccinated more than 2 months before parturition had a mortality rate of 33%. Administration of emergency vaccination 2 days after the occurrence of the index case was the probable reason for the rapid blocking of the FMD spread within 6 days from its onset in the pen.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)87-92
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Veterinary Science
Volume16
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 The Korean Society of Veterinary Science.

Keywords

  • Colostrum
  • Emergency vaccination
  • Foot-and-mouth disease
  • Maternal immunity
  • Vaccine effectiveness

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