Associations of social environment, socioeconomic position and social mobility with immune response in young adults: The Jerusalem Perinatal Family Follow-Up Study

Gabriella M. Lawrence, Yehiel Friedlander, Ronit Calderon-Margalit, Daniel A. Enquobahrie, Jonathan Yinhao Huang, Russell P. Tracy, Orly Manor, David S. Siscovick, Hagit Hochner*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objectives Immune response to cytomegalovirus (CMV) impacts adult chronic disease. This study investigates associations of childhood and adulthood social environment, socioeconomic position (SEP) and social mobility with CMV response in young adults. Design Historical prospective study design. Setting Subcohort of all 17 003 births to residents of Jerusalem between 1974 and 1976. Participants Participants included 1319 young adults born in Jerusalem with extensive archival and follow-up data, including childhood and adulthood SEP-related factors and anti-CMV IgG titre levels and seroprevalence measured at age 32. Main exposure and outcome measures Principal component analysis was used to transform correlated social environment and SEP-related variables at two time points (childhood and adulthood) into two major scores reflecting household (eg, number of siblings/children, religiosity) and socioeconomic (eg, occupation, education) components. Based on these components, social mobility variables were created. Linear and Poisson regression models were used to investigate associations of components and mobility with anti-CMV IgG titre level and seroprevalence, adjusted for confounders. Results Lower levels of household and socioeconomic components in either childhood or adulthood were associated with higher anti-CMV IgG titre level and seropositivity at age 32. Compared with individuals with stable favourable components, anti-CMV IgG titre level and risk for seropositivity were higher in stable unfavourable household and socioeconomic components (household: β=3.23, P<0.001; relative risk (RR)=1.21, P<0.001; socioeconomic: β=2.20, P=0.001; RR=1.14, P=0.01), downward household mobility (β=4.32, P<0.001; RR=1.26, P<0.001) and upward socioeconomic mobility (β=1.37, P=0.04; RR=1.19, P<0.001). Among seropositive individuals, associations between household components and mobility with anti-CMV IgG titre level were maintained and associations between socioeconomic components and mobility with anti-CMV IgG titre level were attenuated. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that accumulating low SEP from childhood through adulthood and social mobility may compromise immune response in young adulthood.

Original languageAmerican English
Article numbere016949
JournalBMJ Open
Volume7
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 Article author(s).

Keywords

  • epidemiology
  • immunology
  • social medicine

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