Attitudes Toward People With Disabilities: The Perspective of Attachment Theory

Noa Vilchinsky*, Liora Findler, Shirli Werner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

25 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Attachment theory was employed as the theoretical framework for the purpose of examining attitudes toward people with disabilities. Method: A total of 404 Jewish Israeli students without disabilities completed the Multidimensional Attitudes Scale Toward Persons With Disabilities (MAS) and the Experiences in Close Relationships Scale (ECR). Results: Reading a scenario about an encounter with a person with a disability gave rise to more negative emotions than reading a similar scenario about an encounter with a person without a disability, regardless of participants' attachment orientations. However, attachment orientations moderated participants' positive cognitions and distancing behaviors. Conclusions: Findings suggest a dynamic process of self-regulation when reacting to a written scenario about people with disabilities. This process consists of an initial spontaneous negative emotional response accompanied by compensatory positive cognitions and behavioral tendencies.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)298-306
Number of pages9
JournalRehabilitation Psychology
Volume55
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2010

Keywords

  • Attachment orientations
  • Attitudes
  • Disability

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