Attitudes Toward the Police in Prolonged Emergencies: Findings from the First Year of the COVID-19 Pandemic in Israel

Gali Perry*, Tal Jonathan-Zamir, Roni Factor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Emergencies, such as natural disasters, wars and terrorist attacks, are known to have important effects on police–community relations and, specifically, on public attitudes toward the police. At the same time, little is known about what happens to public sentiments over time in prolonged emergencies. Similarly, it is unclear if different types of attitudes follow a similar trajectory or if they “behave” differently. The present study examines general and pandemic-specific attitudes toward the police over the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic in Israel, using data from a community panel survey (n = 535) carried out in its first three peaks. We found a statistically significant deterioration in all types of attitudes in the first six months of the study, followed by stabilization in general attitudes. Interestingly, some emergency-specific attitudes followed a different path and demonstrated consistent deterioration throughout the study period. These findings contribute to our theoretical understanding of police–community relations in emergencies and bear practical implications for policing emergencies.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)170-196
Number of pages27
JournalInternational Annals of Criminology
Volume62
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 19 Mar 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© International Society of Criminology, 2024.

Keywords

  • COVID-19
  • emergencies
  • police–community relations
  • policing
  • public attitudes

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