Behaviosites: A novel paradigm for affecting distributed behavior from a healthy society to a wealthy society

Amit Shabtay*, Zinovi Rabinovich, Jeffrey S. Rosenschein

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper we present the Behaviosite paradigm, a new approach to affecting the behavior of distributed agents in a multiagent system, which is inspired by biological parasites with behavior manipulation properties. Behaviosites are special kinds of agents that "infect" a system composed of agents operating in that environment. The behaviosites facilitate behavioral changes in agents to achieve altered, potentially improved, performance of the overall system. Behaviosites need to be designed so that they are intimately familiar with the internal workings of the environment and of the agents operating within it, and behaviosites apply this knowledge for their manipulation, using various infection and manipulation strategies. To demonstrate and test this paradigm, we implemented a version of the El Farol problem, where agents want to go to a bar of limited capacity, and cannot use communication to coordinate their activity. Several solutions to this problem exist, but most yield near-zero utility for the agents. We added behaviosites to the El Farol problem, which manipulate the decision making process of some of the agents by making them believe that bar capacity is lower than it really is. We show that behaviosites overcome the learning ability of the agents, and increase social utility and social fairness significantly, with little actual damage to the overall system, and none to the agents.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationEngineering Self-Organising Systems - 4th International Workshop ESOA 2006, Revised and Invited Papers
Pages82-98
Number of pages17
StatePublished - 2007
Event4th International Workshop on Engineering Self-Organising Applications, ESOA 2006 - Hakodate, Japan
Duration: 9 May 20069 May 2006

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
Volume4335 LNAI
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

Conference4th International Workshop on Engineering Self-Organising Applications, ESOA 2006
Country/TerritoryJapan
CityHakodate
Period9/05/069/05/06

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