Behaviour management needs for the orthodontic treatment of children with disabilities

Stella Chaushu, Adrian Becker*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

A displeasing dental appearance may have a significant emotional impact on an individual's well being. Although malocclusions occur more often in physically and/or mentally handicapped children than in normal children, the most severely handicapped patients are those least likely to receive orthodontic treatment. This investigation studied the modes of behaviour management used in the orthodontic treatment of disabled children, and the preferred criteria. The files of 49 disabled children were retrospectively evaluated. Two classification systems, the Frankl Behaviour Rating Scale (FBRS), and that of Owen and Graber were found to be unsuitable for determining the appropriate treatment modality. Five specific factors, frequently seen in disabled children, gag reflex, drooling, uncontrollable movements, inability to remain still, and the need for additional procedures, were graded and a scoring system was devised to include these factors within the assessment. This scoring system may be used to evaluate new patients and to assist in the choice of the appropriate behavioural management mode.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)143-149
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Orthodontics
Volume22
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2000
Externally publishedYes

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