Between Childhood Maltreatment and Shame: The Roles of Self-Objectification and Disrupted Body Boundaries

Anat Talmon*, Karni Ginzburg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Scopus citations

Abstract

One of the most devastating long-term outcomes of childhood maltreatment is a sense of shame, which is connected to distress and reduced well-being. The aim of the current study was to examine a dual-path model and to test the relations between childhood maltreatment, shame, and well-being as mediated by both self-objectification and a sense of disrupted body boundaries among 531 female college/university students living in Israel. Results from the structural equation modeling analyses indicated that both self-objectification and disrupted body boundaries significantly mediated the association between childhood maltreatment and sense of shame. In addition, both were associated with reduced levels of well-being, through the mediating role of shame. Finally, we discuss the role these paths may play in the detrimental long-term effects of childhood maltreatment and how they may be targeted in clinical interventions for adult survivors.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)325-337
Number of pages13
JournalPsychology of Women Quarterly
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017.

Keywords

  • childhood maltreatment
  • disrupted body boundaries
  • self-objectification
  • shame

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