Between “Me, Myself, and I” and the “Royal We”: Gender Differences in Personalized Political Discourse on Facebook and User Involvement

Renana Atia*, Meital Balmas

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study focuses on discursive personalism on social media and especially on the differences between female and male politicians. More specifically, we test discursive personalism outside of a campaign period as a predictor of social media involvement (of users). A manual content analysis of posts by female and male politicians in the context of Israeli politics (N = 1,392) shows that higher levels of personalized discourse predict a higher level of user involvement (i.e., likes, comments, shares, and aggregate engagement). Additionally, we demonstrate that, compared with posts authored by male politicians, female politicians’ communications exhibit a unique discourse style, with higher levels of discursive personalism, and, as a consequence, draw more involvement on the part of Facebook users.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)6154-6177
Number of pages24
JournalInternational Journal of Communication
Volume17
StatePublished - 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
Copyright © 2023 (Renana Atia and Meital Balmas). Licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial No Derivatives (by-nc-nd). Available at http://ijoc.org.

Keywords

  • Facebook
  • content analysis
  • discursive personalism
  • gender
  • political personalization

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