Calcium Channel Blocker Use and the Risk for Breast Cancer: A Population-Based Nested Case-Control Study

Victoria Rotshild, Bruria Hirsh Raccah, Muna Gazawe, Ilan Matok*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

We investigated whether long-term exposure to calcium channel blockers (CCBs) is associated with an increased risk of breast cancer (BCa). We designed a nested case–control study based on data from the Clalit electronic database, the largest Israeli Health Services organization. All newly diagnosed breast cancer (BCa) cases were selected from a cohort of patients with hypertension. Ten controls were matched for each BCa case. The odds ratios (ORs) of BCa among CCBs users were calculated using multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses. A total of 4875 patients with newly diagnosed BCa were identified from the cohort with a median follow-up of 5.15 years. The exposure to CCBs was not associated with an increased risk of BCa (OR = 0.98; 95% CI, 0.92–1.04). Additionally, there was no association between long-term exposure to CCBs (above eight years) and increased BCa risk (OR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.67–1.21). Higher cumulative doses of CCBs were not associated with an elevated risk of BCa (OR = 0.997; 95% CI, 0.962–1.034, calculated per 1000 DDD). Based on this large population-based study, long-term exposure to CCBs was not associated with an increased risk of BCa. Considering that CCBs are widely used medications, our results provide important safety information on a population level, especially for patients with an increased risk of BCa.

Original languageAmerican English
Article number2344
JournalCancers
Volume14
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 9 May 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Keywords

  • breast cancer
  • calcium channel blocker
  • case–control study
  • epidemiology

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