Can democracy and nationalism be understood apart? the case of zionism and its critics

Gadi Taub*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The modern nation-state is the most common, and so far the most stable, vehicle for modern democracy. The case of Zionism offers a unique opportunity for inquiring into this connection since mainstream Zionism consciously founded its institutions on the premise that democracy and the national state are mutually dependent. Moreover, ever since the early days of Zionism, opposing plans to separate the two—a non-democratic national state and a non-national democratic state—have been, and still are, hotly debated. This article surveys the origins of these ideas and argues that, both politically and theoretically, neither the party of non-democratic nationalism nor the party of non-national democracy offers a viable or even coherent plan. It would seem that non-national democracy will subvert democracy as well as nationalism, and non-democratic nationalism will undermine the national as well as the democratic character of the state.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)157-177
Number of pages21
JournalInternational Journal of Phytoremediation
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2007

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