CHRC, encoding a chromoplast-specific carotenoid-associated protein, is an early gibberellic acid-responsive gene

Michael Vishnevetsky, Marianna Ovadis, Hanan Itzhaki, Alexander Vainstein*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

CHRC, a corolla-specific carotenoid-associated protein, is a major component of carotenoid-lipoprotein complexes in Cucumis sativus chromoplasts. Using an in vitro flower bud culture system that mimics in vivo flower development, CHRC mRNA levels in corollas were shown to be specifically up-regulated by gibberellic acid. The response to gibberellic acid was very rapid (within 20 min) and insensitive to protein synthesis inhibition by cycloheximide. Abscisic acid, known to antagonize gibberellin in many developmental systems, strongly down-regulated CHRC mRNA levels. The gibberellin synthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol exhibited a similar negative effect on CHRC expression. Inclusion of exogenous gibberellic acid into the in vitro bud culture system with the paclobutrazol not only prevented the CHRC mRNA down-regulation, it up-regulated transcript accumulation to the level of gibberellic acid-treated corollas. CHRC mRNA accumulation in response to gibberellic acid displayed a dose-dependent increase up to 10- 4 M gibberellic acid. The up-regulation could be detected with as little as 10-7 M gibberellic acid. Based on these data, we suggest that CHRC is the first structural gene identified to date whose expression is regulated by gibberellic acid in a primary fashion. The critical role of the rapid response of CHRC to gibberellic acid in aiding carotenoid sequestration while preserving chromoplast structural organization is discussed.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)24747-24750
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume272
Issue number40
DOIs
StatePublished - 3 Oct 1997

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