Comparison of workload traces from two production parallel machines

K. Windisch*, V. Lo, D. Feitelson, R. Moore, B. Nitzberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaperpeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

The analysis of workload traces from real production parallel machines can aid a wide variety of parallel processing research, providing a realistic basis for experimentation in the management of resources over an entire workload. We analyze a five-month workload trace of an Intel Paragon machine supporting a production parallel workload at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC), comparing and contrasting it with a similar workload study of an Intel iPSC/860 machine at NASA Ames NAS. Our analysis of workload characteristics takes into account the job scheduling policies of the sites and focuses on characteristics such as job size distribution (job parallelism), resource usage, runtimes, submission patterns, and wait times. Despite fundamental differences in the two machines and their respective usage environments, we observe a number of interesting similarities with respect to job size distribution, system utilization, runtime distribution, and interarrival time distribution. We hope to gain insight into the potential use of workload traces for evaluating resource management polices at supercomputing sites and for providing both real-world job streams and accurate stochastic workload models for use in simulation analysis of resource management policies.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages319-326
Number of pages8
StatePublished - 1996
Externally publishedYes
EventProceedings of the 1996 6th Symposium on the Frontiers of Massively Parallel Computing, Frontiers'96 - Annapolis, MD, USA
Duration: 27 Oct 199631 Oct 1996

Conference

ConferenceProceedings of the 1996 6th Symposium on the Frontiers of Massively Parallel Computing, Frontiers'96
CityAnnapolis, MD, USA
Period27/10/9631/10/96

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