Constructing a symbol of defeat and national rejuvenation: Edirne (adrianople) in Ottoman propaganda and writing during the Balkan wars

Eyal Ginio*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Angela Guéron penned these lines in her diary on 3 March 1913. The diary, first published by Avigdor Levy,1 is a rare testimony of the suffering of the civil population inside the besieged city of Edirne. Guéron was at the time a teacher in the local Alliance Jewish school for girls. She spent all five months of the blockade in her native city of Edirne and so was able to report the daily events that shook her life as well as those of her fellow-citizens. Her diary provides us with a glimpse into those eventful days in the history of Edirne, the second capital of the Ottoman to Istanbul.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationCities into Battlefields
Subtitle of host publicationMetropolitan Scenarios, Experiences and Commemorations of Total War
PublisherTaylor and Francis
Pages83-99
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9781351951500
ISBN (Print)9780754660385
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2017
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© Stefan Goebel and Derek Keene and the contributors 2011.

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