Converging administrative systems: Recruitment and training in eu member states

June Burnham, Moshe Maor*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article proposes a methodology for testing whether the administrative systems of the EU and its member states are converging as a consequence of the institutional development of the EU. The aims are twofold: (1) to discover how far the institutional development of the EU is bringing about common recruitment and training practices within the administration of the EU and its member states, and (2) to examine whether the roles and role perceptions of officials are converging as a consequence of this development. The hypothesis underpinning the investigation is that the institutional development of the EU - with the negotiation and bargaining between administrative systems (i.e. the joint policy-making process) - may be bringing the way in which officials see their roles and their recruitment and training policies closer together. By categorizing officials surveyed according to their level of exposure to EU policy-making, the methodology enables any specific convergence induced by EU integration to be distinguished from the second common influence of west European administrative modernization: new public management. @ 1995 Taylor & Francis Group.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)185-204
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of European Public Policy
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1995
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Convergence
  • Multi-level bureaucracy
  • New public management
  • Recruitment
  • Role perceptions
  • Training

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