Cultural Aspects Within Caregiver Interactions of Ultra-Orthodox Jewish Women and Their Family Members With Mental Illness

Penina Weiss*, Ron Shor, Naomi Hadas-Lidor

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The role of cultural dynamics and norms within families of persons with mental illness has been an underexplored subject, although the familial context has been recognized as influential. This subject was studied with 24 ultra-Orthodox Jewish mothers of persons with mental illness who live in a relatively closed religious community. While participating in the Keshet educational program designed for family caregivers in mental health, they wrote Meaningful Interactional Life Episodes that involved a dialogue exchange in their lives. Qualitative analysis of 50 episodes illuminates the significant role that religious and cultural norms have in the perceptions of what are considered stressors and the dynamics in these families surrounding these stressors. The necessity and value of incorporating cultural competence into family educational programs and interventions is emphasized, as this may contribute to the potential use and success of mental health service models within a population that essentially underutilizes these services.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)520-527
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Volume83
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 2013

Keywords

  • Events analysis
  • Female caregivers
  • Keshet course
  • Matchmaking
  • Meaningful Interactional Life Episode
  • Mental illness
  • Religion
  • Religious community
  • Religious traditions
  • Ultra-Orthodox Jews
  • Wounded storyteller

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