Data ships: An empirical examination of open (closed) data

Karine Nahon, Alon Peled

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

As part of endorsing the open government data movement in many parts of the world, governments have worked to increase openness in actions where information technologies play a major role. Releasing public data was perceived by many governments and officials as a fundamental element to achieve transparency and accountability. Many studies have criticized this approach and illustrated that open government data does not necessarily lead to open government. Our study examines for the first time in a systematic, quantitative way the status of open government data in the US, by focusing on the disclosure of data by US federal agencies. Our findings suggest that most US federal agencies largely do not follow the open government policies of 2009 and 2013. The paper discusses the type of public data that is released, and analyzes the (non) strategy of its release.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015
EditorsTung X. Bui, Ralph H. Sprague
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages2209-2220
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9781479973675
DOIs
StatePublished - 26 Mar 2015
Event48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015 - Kauai, United States
Duration: 5 Jan 20158 Jan 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Volume2015-March
ISSN (Print)1530-1605

Conference

Conference48th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2015
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityKauai
Period5/01/158/01/15

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015 IEEE.

Keywords

  • Disclosure
  • Information assets
  • Open government
  • Open government data
  • Transparency

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