Decision Making of Israeli, East European, and South American Dental School Graduates in Third Molar Surgery: Is There a Difference?

Yehuda Zadik*, Liran Levin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate decision making among Israeli, Eastern European, and South American dental school graduates in oral surgery issues. Materials and Methods: During a military dental convention, a survey was conducted among 85 dentists that included a questionnaire and a panoramic image presentation. Results: Removal of the mandibular third molar was recommended more often by the Israeli graduates, Eastern European dentists recommended less maxillary antagonist extraction, and South American graduates had the lowest rate of recommendation for extraction of a partially impacted mesioangular and distoangular mandibular third molar in a 19-year-old patient, and of a fully impacted horizontal mandibular third molar in 19- and 35-year-old patients. In all groups, more dentists recommended extraction of disease-free third molars in 35-year-old than in 19-year-old patients. Conclusion: According to study results, decision making regarding third molar treatment is not evidence-based and is not rational. Further postgraduate education in this area is warranted.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)658-662
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume65
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2007
Externally publishedYes

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