Detection of red palm weevil infected trees using thermal imaging

O. Golomb*, V. Alchanatis, Y. Cohen, N. Levin, Y. Cohen, V. Soroker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

The red palm weevil (RPW) is a palm borer insect that develops within the soft tissues of the trunk and crown, eventually leading to tree death. Early detection of RPW infestation is crucial. The RPW larvae developing inside the palm and direct visual detection of the infestation is quite difficult. The hypothesis was that the tunneling insects destroy the vascular system of the palm and create local conditions of water stress. The goal of this study was to examine the ability to detect infected trees using thermal images. By measurements, imaging and analyzing of infected and uninfected trees over multi-year experiments in quarantine and commercial orchards, results partially showed that the RPW creates water stress and affects canopy temperature. Analysis of aerial thermal image above date palm plantation successfully detected infected trees.

Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationPrecision Agriculture 2015 - Papers Presented at the 10th European Conference on Precision Agriculture, ECPA 2015
EditorsJohn V. Stafford
PublisherWageningen Academic Publishers
Pages643-650
Number of pages8
ISBN (Electronic)9789086862672
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015
Event10th European Conference on Precision Agriculture, ECPA 2015 - Tel-Aviv, Israel
Duration: 12 Jul 201516 Jul 2015

Publication series

NamePrecision Agriculture 2015 - Papers Presented at the 10th European Conference on Precision Agriculture, ECPA 2015

Conference

Conference10th European Conference on Precision Agriculture, ECPA 2015
Country/TerritoryIsrael
CityTel-Aviv
Period12/07/1516/07/15

Keywords

  • Canopy temperature
  • Crop water stress index
  • Palm pests
  • Palms
  • Remote sensing

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