Deterministic access of broadband frequency combs in microresonators using cnoidal waves in the soliton crystal limit

ZHEN QI*, AMIR LESHEM, JOSE A. JARAMILLO-VILLEGAS, GIUSEPPE D'AGUANNO, THOMAS F. CARRUTHERS, OMRI GAT, ANDREW M. WEINER, CURTIS R. MENYUK

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

We present a method to deterministically obtain broad bandwidth frequency combs in microresonators. These broadband frequency combs correspond to cnoidal waves in the limit when they can be considered soliton crystals or single solitons. The method relies on moving adiabatically through the (frequency detuning)×(pump amplitude) parameter space, while avoiding the chaotic regime. We consider in detail Si3N4 microresonators with small or intermediate dimensions and an SiO2 microresonator with large dimensions, corresponding to prior experimental work. We also discuss the impact of thermal effects on the stable regions for the cnoidal waves. Their principal effect is to increase the detuning for all the stable regions, but they also skew the stable regions, since higher pump power corresponds to higher power and hence increased temperature and detuning. The change in the detuning is smaller for single solitons than it is for soliton crystals. Without temperature effects, the stable regions for single solitons and soliton crystals almost completely overlap. When thermal effects are included, the stable region for single solitons separates from the stable regions for the soliton crystals, explaining in part the effectiveness of backwards-detuning to obtaining single solitons.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)36304-36315
Number of pages12
JournalOptics Express
Volume28
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - 23 Nov 2020

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© 2020 Optical Society of America.

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