Dielectric Response of Cytoplasmic Water and Its Connection to the Vitality of Human Red Blood Cells. II. the Influence of Storage

Evgeniya Levy, Marcelo David, Gregory Barshtein, Saul Yedgar, Leonid Livshits, Paul Ben Ishai, Yuri Feldman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

Maintaining an appropriate inventory of packaged blood products is a critical part of modern medicine. Consequently, the assessment of red blood cell (RBC) functionality is instrumental for the monitoring of the quality of stored RBC (sRBC) in the blood bank. We present a comprehensive study of sRBC lesion kinetics in SAGM (saline, adenine, glucose, mannitol) solution, using microwave dielectric spectroscopy (0.5-50 GHz) and cell deformability. As part of the research, we have isolated the microwave dielectric response of cytoplasmic water in sRBC. The extracted dielectric parameters are sensitive to the age of the cells and, in particular, to the critical moment of transition from discocyte to echinocyte. From the analysis of the dielectric relaxation as a function of storage-duration, we postulate that the behavior is rooted in the delicate interplay between bound and bulk water in the cellular interior. In particular, the microwave dielectric response reflects the moment when the continuous diffusion of oxygen to the cell and the oxygenation of hemoglobin affects the role played by water in the maintenance of cell integrity. These results open a possible new avenue for the noninvasive inspection of stored red blood cells, permitting a true inventory system for the modern blood bank.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)5273-5278
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Physical Chemistry B
Volume121
Issue number20
DOIs
StatePublished - 25 May 2017

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2017 American Chemical Society.

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