Differential response to placebo among patients with social phobia, panic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder

Jonathan D. Huppert*, Luke T. Schultz, Edna B. Foa, David H. Barlow, Jonathan R.T. Davidson, Jack M. Gorman, M. Katherine Shear, H. Blair Simpson, Scott W. Woods

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: Placebo effects in treatment of three anxiety disorders were compared. Method: Treatment response and patients' treatment expectancy were examined by using data from 70 patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder, social phobia, or panic disorder who received placebo in three randomized, controlled trials comparing cognitive behavior therapy, medication, and their combination to placebo. Results: Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder were less likely to respond to placebo than patients with generalized social phobia or panic disorder. Differential expectancy did not account for these findings. Conclusions: Further examination of the placebo effect across the anxiety disorders may elucidate maintenance mechanisms of these disorders and have implications for development of more effective treatments.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1485-1487
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume161
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2004
Externally publishedYes

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