Dispositional effects on job and life satisfaction: The role of core evaluations

Timothy A. Judge*, Edwin A. Locke, Cathy C. Durham, Avraham N. Kluger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1118 Scopus citations

Abstract

Past research has suggested that dispositional sources of job satisfaction can be traced to measures of affective temperament. The present research focused on another concept, core self-evaluations, which were hypothesized to comprise self-esteem, generalized self-efficacy, locus of control, and nonneuroticism. A model hypothesized that core self-evaluations would have direct effects on job and life satisfaction. It also was hypothesized that core self-evaluations would have indirect effects on job satisfaction. Data were collected from 3 independent samples in 2 countries, using dual source methodology. Results indicated that core self-evaluations had direct and indirect effects on job and life satisfaction. The statistical and logical relationship among core evaluations, affective disposition, and satisfaction was explored.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)17-34
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume83
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1998

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