Distance Breeds Alienation: Perceived Ideological Distance Lowers Students’ Evaluations of Their Professors

Omer Yair*, Raanan Sulitzeanu-Kenan

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Teaching social sciences frequently involves politically and ideologically fraught issues. This study examines the effect of students’ perceived ideological distance from their professors on their academic experience, drawing on a survey of 1,257 students from Social Science and Law faculties in Israel across five different universities. Congruent with previous findings from the US, the study’s results demonstrate that perceived ideological distance lowers students’ evaluations of their professors’ commitment to their success. Implications of the findings are discussed with reference to the current underrepresentation of right-wing and conservative academics in the social sciences.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)794-806
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Political Science Education
Volume17
Issue numberS1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2021

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
The Max Kampelman Chair for Democracy and Human Rights at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem provided financial support for this research. The authors wish to thank Noam Gidron, Maayan Mor, and Chagai Weiss for their helpful comments.

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

Keywords

  • Teaching
  • alienation
  • ideological distance

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