Distance-decay relationships partially determine diversity patterns of phyllosphere bacteria on Tamrix trees across the sonoran desert

Omri M. Finkel, Adrien Y. Burch, Tal Elad, Susan M. Huse, Steven E. Lindow, Anton F. Post, Shimshon Belkin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

84 Scopus citations

Abstract

Dispersal limitation in phyllosphere communities was measured on the leaf surfaces of salt-excreting Tamarix trees, which offer unique, discrete habitats for microbial assemblages. We employed 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing to measure bacterial community dissimilarity on leaves of spatially dispersed Tamarix specimens in sites with uniform climatic conditions across the Sonoran Desert in the Southwestern United States. Our analyses revealed diverse bacterial communities with four dominant phyla that exhibited differential effects of environmental and geographic variables. Geographical distance was the most important parameter that affected community composition, particularly that of betaproteobacteria, which displayed a statistically significant, distance-decay relationship.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)6187-6193
Number of pages7
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume78
Issue number17
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2012

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