District plans in Israel: post-mortem?

Eran Razin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

17 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this paper, I qualitatively examine the rise and possible fall of statutory district plans as a major tool of regional planning in Israel. Rigid statutory regional plans are a top-down means, and the Israeli case demonstrates that their days are not necessarily over in an era of ‘soft spaces’ and complex governance networks. The swing of the pendulum in attitudes toward these plans is not associated with centralization–decentralization trends. Rather, it reflects power relations between two centralized coalitions of stakeholders. The one led by elected politicians favors proactive-developmental goals, aiming at state-led open-ended or non-statutory planning. The other coalition, led by central state bureaucrats, favors strict regulation. NGOs, assumed to form the core of soft horizontal governance networks, paradoxically support top-down ‘hard’ modes of regional planning, in the name of environmental sustainability that is not necessarily best served by bottom-up soft approaches.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1246-1264
Number of pages19
JournalEnvironment and Planning C: Government and Policy
Volume33
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2015

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2015, The Author(s) 2015.

Keywords

  • Israel
  • centralization–decentralization
  • regional plans
  • soft spaces

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