Do we understand sex-related differences governing dimorphic disease mechanisms in preclinical animal models of osteoarthritis?

Mona Dvir-Ginzberg*, Yonathan H. Maatuf, Ali Mobasheri

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Research conducted using murine preclinical models of osteoarthritis (OA) over the last three decades has brought forth many exciting developments showcasing mechanisms and pathways that drive disease pathogenesis. These models have identified therapeutic targets that can be modulated via innovative biologicals and pharmaceuticals. However, many of these approaches have failed to translate to humans and reach the clinic. This commentary aims to highlight some of the key hurdles in the translation of novel findings using preclinical OA models with a focus on sex-related differences and variations in chondrosenescence in these animal models. Notably, besides chondrosenescence, other signaling mechanisms have been shown to be affected by sexual dimorphism (i.e. TGFβ signaling, EGFR/integrin α1β1 and Trpv4). Preclinical models of OA mainly utilize male mice due to their capacity to manifest fast progressing OA structural phenotype compared to female mice. This experimental trend has overlooked and ignored the sex-related effects of numerous mechanisms affecting joint structure, that influence OA structural progression. Future work should focus on analyzing both sexes and understanding sex-related differences, which will enable us to gain a better understanding of the progression of OA based on sex-related mechanistic discrepancies, and potentially improve translatability.

Original languageAmerican English
JournalOsteoarthritis and Cartilage
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2024 Osteoarthritis Research Society International

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