Does a free-of-charge distribution of boil-and-bite mouthguards to young adult amateur sportsmen affect oral and facial trauma?

Yehuda Zadik, Liran Levin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

21 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the compliance effectiveness of free-of-charge distribution of boil-and-bite mouthguards to amateur sportsmen who exercise and play without a formal team, a coach, or regulations. Several infantry units in the Israel Defense Forces distributed maxillary boil-and-bite mouthguards to their recruits. Target companies from these battalions and from similar battalions (comparison group -mouthguards not supplied), were selected. Soldiers were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Of the 630 male participants, 272 received a mouthguard and 358 served as the comparison group. No differences were found between groups regarding demographic parameters or overall trauma cases. When compliance to a free-of-charge distributed boil-and-bite mouthguard was assessed, 93 (34.2%) participants reported using the mouthguard during sport activities. Compliance was high for martial arts, but low for other sports. Although the number of self-reported sport-related oral/dental trauma cases was similar between mouthguard users and non-users, the users group showed less severe injuries. However, free distribution to young amateur sportsmen does not affect oral and dental trauma unless accompanied by education and motivation.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)69-72
Number of pages4
JournalDental Traumatology
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2009
Externally publishedYes

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