Does parental quality matter? Evidence on the transmission of human capital using variation in parental influence from death, divorce, and family size

Eric D. Gould*, Avi Simhon, Bruce A. Weinberg

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper examines the transmission of human capital from parents to children using variation in parental influence due to parental death, divorce, and the increasing specialization of parental roles in larger families. All three sources of variation yield strikingly similar patterns that show that the strong parent-child correlation in human capital is largely causal. In each case, the parent-child correlation in education is stronger with the parent who spends more time with the child and weaker with the parent who spends relatively less time parenting. These findings help us understand why educated parents spend more time with their children.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)569-610
Number of pages42
JournalJournal of Labor Economics
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2020

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