Does Promoting One Healthy Behavior Detract from Others? Evidence from a Field Experiment

Hannah Trachtman*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Impact evaluations of behavioral interventions typically focus on target outcomes. Might interventions induce negative spillovers on other behaviors? I run a large field experiment in which individuals receive combinations of messages and incentives promoting two healthy behaviors, meditation and meal logging. I find that the interventions reduce completion rates of the opposite behavior by 19–29 percent. I find that interventions with larger target effects do not necessarily generate larger negative spillovers, and demonstrate implications for cost-effectiveness analysis. I investigate the mechanisms behind the observed spillovers.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)249-277
Number of pages29
JournalAmerican Economic Journal: Applied Economics
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2024

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© (2024), (American Economic Association). All Rights Reserved.

Keywords

  • C93
  • D62
  • D91
  • I12

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Does Promoting One Healthy Behavior Detract from Others? Evidence from a Field Experiment'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this