Early morphological effects in reading: Evidence from parafoveal preview benefit in Hebrew

Avital Deutsch*, Ram Frost, Sharon Pelleg, Alexander Pollatsek, Keith Rayner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

88 Scopus citations

Abstract

Hebrew words are composed of two interwoven morphemes: a triconsonantal root and a word pattern. We examined the role of the root morpheme in word identification by assessing the benefit of presentation of a parafoveal preview word derived from the same root as a target word. Although the letter information of the preview was not consciously perceived, a preview of a word derived from the same root morpheme as the foveal target word facilitated eye-movement measures of first-pass reading (i.e., first fixation and gaze duration). These results are the first to demonstrate early morphological effects in the context of sentence reading in which no external task is imposed on the reader, and converge with previous findings of morphemic priming in Hebrew using the masked priming paradigm, and morphemic parafoveal preview benefit effects in a single-word identification task.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)415-422
Number of pages8
JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2003

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