Effect of fall irrigation level in 'Mauritius' and 'Floridian' lychee on soil and plant water status, flowering intensity, and yield

R. A. Stern*, M. Meron, A. Naor, R. Wallach, B. Bravdo, S. Gazit

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

52 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effect of fall irrigation level in 'Mauritius' and 'Floridian' lychee (Litchi chinerisis Sonn.) on soil and plant water status, flowering intensity, and yield the following year was studied in a field during 2 consecutive years. At the end of the second vegetative flush after harvest (1 Oct. 1994 and 10 Oct. 1995), four irrigation treatments were initiated: 0.5, 0.25, 0.125, and 0 Class A pan evaporation coefficients designated 100%, 50%, 25%, and 0%. The three lower irrigation levels effectively stopped shoot growth, suggesting the 50% treatment to be the threshold for shoot growth cessation in both years. For both years, flowering intensity and yield in the 100% treatment were lower than those following the other three treatments. Soil and plant water-stress indicators responded to the water-stress irrigation treatments. However soil water-potential values were highly variable relative to plant water potentials. Stem water potential differed more markedly between treatments than leaf water potential. Midday stem water potential appeared to be the best water-stress indicator for irrigation control. Midday stem water potential in both years was correlated with midday vapor-pressure deficit, suggesting that the threshold for irrigation control should take into account evaporative demand.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)150-155
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the American Society for Horticultural Science
Volume123
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 1998

Keywords

  • Leaf water potential
  • Litchi chinensis
  • Stem water potential
  • Water stress

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of fall irrigation level in 'Mauritius' and 'Floridian' lychee on soil and plant water status, flowering intensity, and yield'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this