Effect of oleoyl glycine and oleoyl alanine on lithium chloride induced nausea in rats and vomiting in shrews

Erin M. Rock, Cheryl L. Limebeer, Reem Smoum, Raphael Mechoulam, Linda A. Parker*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rationale: The fatty acid amide oleoyl glycine (OlGly) and its more stable methylated form oleoyl alanine (OlAla) reduce naloxone-precipitated morphine withdrawal (MWD)-induced conditioned gaping (nausea) responses in rats. In addition, OlGly has been shown to reduce lithium chloride (LiCl)–induced conditioned gaping in rats and vomiting in Suncus murinus (house musk shrews). Objectives: Here, we compared the potential of these fatty acid amides to maintain their anti-nausea/anti-emetic effect over a delay. The following experiments examined the potential of a wider dose range of OlGly and OlAla to interfere with (1) LiCl-induced conditioned gaping in rats and (2) LiCl-induced vomiting in shrews, when administered 20 or 70 min prior to illness. Results: OlAla (1, 5, 20 mg/kg) reduced LiCl-induced conditioned gaping, with OlGly only effective at the high dose (20 mg/kg), with no effect of pretreatment delay time. At the high dose of 20 mg/kg, OlGly increased passive drips during conditioning suggesting a sedative effect. In shrews, both OlGly and OlAla (1, 5 mg/kg) suppressed LiCl-induced vomiting, with no effect of pretreatment delay. OlAla more effectively suppressed vomiting, with OlAla (5 mg/kg) also increasing the latency to the first vomiting reaction. Conclusions: OlAla was more effective than OlGly in reducing both LiCl-induced gaping in rats and LiCl-induced vomiting in shrews. These findings provide further evidence that these fatty acid amides may be useful treatments for nausea and vomiting, with OlAla demonstrating superior efficacy.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)377-383
Number of pages7
JournalPsychopharmacology
Volume239
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2022

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature.

Keywords

  • Conditioned gaping
  • Oleoyl alanine
  • Oleoyl glycine
  • Vomiting

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