Effectiveness of sensorimotor and task-oriented handwriting intervention in elementary school-aged students with handwriting difficulties

Naomi Weintraub*, Michael Yinon, Idit Bar Effrat Hirsch, Shula Parush

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

47 Scopus citations

Abstract

The effects of two handwriting intervention programs for students with handwriting difficulties were compared. Students in grades 2 to 4 were randomly assigned to a sensorimotor intervention (n = 19), a task-oriented intervention (n = 19), or a nontreatment control group (n = 17). Both intervention programs also included "higher-level" functions (e.g., cognitive or executive functions). Handwriting speed and legibility were measured before, immediately after (Stage 1), and 4 months after (Stage 2) intervention. At Stage 1, statistically significant gains in handwriting performance were noted in both intervention groups, but not in the control group. Additionally, the task-oriented group scored significantly higher than the control group in overall legibility. At Stage 2, statistically significant gains were noted in both intervention groups. Thus, although neither program was found to have an advantage in terms of its unique components, it appears that students with handwriting difficulties may benefit from intervention programs that include instruction in "higher-level" strategies to support and enhance their handwriting performance.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)125-134
Number of pages10
JournalOTJR Occupation, Participation and Health
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 2009

Keywords

  • Handwriting
  • Higher-level functions
  • Treatment effectiveness

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