Emotion regulation in violent conflict: Reappraisal, hope, and support for humanitarian aid to the opponent in wartime

Eran Halperin*, James J. Gross

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

117 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is well known that negative intergroup emotions such as anger, fear, and hatred play a major role in initiating and maintaining intergroup conflicts. It is far less clear, however, what factors promote the resolution of intergroup conflicts. Using an emotion regulation- framework, we hypothesised that one form of emotion regulation-namely cognitive reappraisal-should play a salutary role in such conflicts, and be associated with increased hope as well as greater support for humanitarian aid to out-group members. To test these hypotheses, we used a nationwide survey of Jewish-Israeli adults, conducted during the war in Gaza between Israelis and Palestinians. Results obtained via structural equation modelling revealed that Israelis who regulated their negative emotions during the war through reappraisal were more supportive in providing humanitarian aid to innocent Palestinian citizens and that this relation was partially mediated by an enhanced feeling of hope.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1228-1236
Number of pages9
JournalCognition and Emotion
Volume25
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Emotion regulation
  • Hope
  • Intergroup conflict
  • Israeli-Palestinian conflict
  • Reappraisal

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