Evaluation of a commercial in-clinic point-of-care polymerase chain reaction test for Ehrlichia canis DNA in artificially infected dogs

Trevor Waner*, Yaarit Nachum-Biala, Shimon Harrus

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

A novel in-clinic point-of-care (ICPOC) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test was evaluated for its ability to detect Ehrlichia canis DNA in artificially infected dogs compared to a real-time PCR assay. Six Beagle dogs negative for E.canis antibodies and PCR negative were artificially infected with an Israeli E.canis strain (611). All dogs developed IgG antibodies 8 days post infection (PI), and clinical and hematological abnormalities on day 10 PI.Only the real-time PCR detected E.canis DNA in the blood of five dogs at days 3 and 5 PI. At day 12 PI during the acute phase of the disease, 1 day after the initiation of doxycycline treatment, the ICPOC PCR assay detected E.canis DNA in all infected dogs, which were also positive by the real-time PCR. Two days later the ICPOC PCR assay was able to detect only 3/6 infected dogs, which were all positive by the real-time PCR. At days 17 and 19 PI, the ICPOC PCR assay did not detect E.canis DNA in the dogs while the real-time PCR detected all dogs as positive on day 17 PI and two dogs on day 19 PI. In conclusion, the sensitivity of the ICPOC PCR assay was 75% for the acute phase of the disease and 30% for the whole study, suggesting that this ICPOC assay has a potential utility for the diagnosis of acute canine monocytic ehrlichiosis.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)618-621
Number of pages4
JournalVeterinary Journal
Volume202
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Dec 2014

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

Keywords

  • Diagnosis
  • Dog
  • Ehrlichia canis
  • PCR
  • Point-of-care test

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