Exposure to the 2014 Gaza War and Support for Militancy: The Role of Emotion Dysregulation

Inbal Zipris, Ruthie Pliskin, Daphna Canetti, Eran Halperin*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

How do wars shape emotions and attitudes in intractable conflicts? In two studies conducted in the aftermath of the 2014 Gaza War in the Middle East, we tested a new theoretical model wherein the ability to regulate emotions is central in determining the influence of war exposure on emotions (i.e., group-based humiliation) and support for militancy, through posttraumatic stress symptoms (PSS). Results supported our model: (a) higher exposure to the war predicted group-based humiliation in both studies and in Study 2 also greater support for militancy; in both studies, (b) higher exposure predicted more PSS only among participants high in emotion dysregulation, and, for them, (c) higher exposure predicted greater group-based humiliation, through increased levels of PSS. Results from Study 2 suggest that (d) group-based humiliation will ultimately lead to greater support for militancy. The findings’ contribution to the different literatures and their integration is discussed.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)965-977
Number of pages13
JournalPersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
Volume45
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2019
Externally publishedYes

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2018 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

Keywords

  • emotion regulation
  • exposure to terrorism and political violence
  • humiliation
  • intractable conflict
  • stress

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