Expression of stress-response proteins upon whitefly-mediated inoculation of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in susceptible and resistant tomato plants

Rena Gorovits, Fouad Akad, Hila Beery, Favi Vidavsky, Assaf Mahadav, Henryk Czosnek*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

42 Scopus citations

Abstract

To better understand the nature of resistance of tomato to the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci, B biotype)-transmitted Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), whiteflies and TYLCV were considered as particular cases of biotic stresses and virus resistance as a particular case of successful response to these stresses. Two inbred tomato lines issued from the same breeding program that used Solanum habrochaites as a TYLCV resistance source, one susceptible and the other resistant, were used to compare the expression of key proteins involved at different stages of the plant response with stresses: mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), cellular heat shock proteins (HSPs, proteases), and pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins. The two biotic stresses - non-viruliferous whitefly feeding and virus infection with viruliferous insects - led to a slow decline in abundance of MAPKs, HSPs, and chloroplast protease FtsH (but not chloroplast protease ClpC), and induced the activities of the PR proteins, β-1,3-glucanase, and peroxidase. This decline was less pronounced in virus-resistant than in virus-susceptible lines. Contrary to whitefly infestation and virus infection, inoculation with the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum induced a rapid accumulation of the stress proteins studied, followed by a decline; the virus-susceptible and -resistant tomato lines behaved similarly in response to the fungus.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)1376-1383
Number of pages8
JournalMolecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Volume20
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2007

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