Families challenged by religious change: A cross-cultural comparison of mothers' images of their daughters

Dorit Roer-Strier, Roberta G. Sands*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

This paper uses the parent's "image of an adaptive adult" (Roer-Strier & Rosenthal, 2001) within an ecological, cultural framework to examine research findings from a study of Jewish families from South Africa and the United States in which an adult daughter has changed from the family's secular or moderate religious orientation to strict, Orthodox Judaism. The study found both similarities and differences in the South African and U.S. mothers' images of their daughters that are related to the ecological contexts in the 2 countries. The partial congruence of the mothers' images with the culture the daughters joined may explain mothers' relatively positive coping with the religious change. The authors show that the concept of adaptive adult is a useful vehicle for practice with families coping with religious and other kinds of cultural change.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)485-494
Number of pages10
JournalFamilies in Society
Volume85
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Families challenged by religious change: A cross-cultural comparison of mothers' images of their daughters'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this